Local Partnerships  logo

Provider: Local Partnerships

Location:
  • London

Website: http://localpartnerships.org.uk/

Contact:Julie.McEver@local.gov.uk

Sector experience:

Areas of expertise:

Organisation overview:

Local Partnerships is a joint venture between HM Treasury and the Local Government Association, formed in 2009 to help the public sector deliver local services and infrastructure. We work with a range of public sector organisations and the community focused third sector to deliver effective, timely and affordable solutions to the challenges they face – for the public good. Across our specialist teams we provide trusted, professional support and advice and deploy a range of technical skills and senior experience. Local Partnerships has a successful track record of providing a suite of services to social enterprises and new ventures to support their growth and to extend their impact. This has included helping these organisations access investment through SEIF, TSF, ICRF, IRF and BPA. In the last two years a dominant focus of this work has been supporting social ventures to understand and evidence their impact and to embed this into their organisations. We take a holistic approach to impact management; theory of change development or refinement, impact plans & measurement approaches, performance management & feedback loops, data management & external evidence & analysis, service / product design & development and leadership development.

Case study 1: For Jimmy

Sector:

  • Citizenship & community

Focus of project:

  • Programme design / theory of change facilitation
  • Developing impact plans
  • Performance management
  • Leadership development
  • Culture change

The project supported For Jimmy in its thinking about the future direction of its business and was an integral part of the work to develop its strategy and objectives for the next three years. A Theory of Change was developed, providing a clear roadmap of the relationship between the problems the organisation is trying to address, the activities and interventions it is delivering and the outcomes it wants to achieve. The work identified the ways that For Jimmy could build upon its current measurement of outcomes in order to develop a stronger evidence base which could fully reflect the scope of its impact on both young people and their local communities. It has enabled a better understanding of how outcome measurement can be used by the organisation to learn, review and refine their activities/services, support business planning and provide evidence of its impact.
The project work ‘tested’ and ‘confirmed’ the mission of the organisation, identified opportunities to extend its impact and set the pace for future growth. Impact measurement and management is no longer an ad-hoc process but is being systematised and embedded into the culture of the organisation and providing a platform to scale up its business and to grow its impact. There is a strong sense of staff ownership. The outcomes of this project have also enabled For Jimmy to secure support from Greenwich University to work with them on further evaluation of their work in primary schools.

Case study 2: Aspire Wellbeing

Sector:

  • Physical health

Focus of project:

  • Programme design / theory of change facilitation
  • Developing impact plans
  • Performance management
  • Leadership development
  • Culture change
  • IT systems support

Aspire and Local Partnerships developed a simple but robust impact measurement system that will provide evidence of activities/interventions and allow for continuous improvement. The project identified ways to evidence a number of different outcomes by systematically drawing together qualitative/quantitative information from staff, users, and carers. The work was assisted by reference to Big Society Capital’s outcomes framework which helped identify the range of outcomes currently achieved (at individual and community levels) and frame ambitions to extend further. The Theory of Change was developed by staff and service users. It has provided an easy/effective tool for describing purpose and the impact Aspire is striving to achieve.
Aspire now has a stronger sense of the positive difference it can make and a way of developing the evidence. It is able to communicate more effectively to commissioners, supporters and partners about current work, new work and business growth. Within the organisation there is a greater understanding of the need to evidence impact to ensure it can win work/attract investment. The involvement of staff and service users in the process of identifying outcomes/impact has ensured that its purpose remains relevant and that Aspire focuses on the most relevant outcomes. The Theory of Change has been reproduced as a poster and is visible around the building and on the website and is helping to embed ideas about the ways Aspire’s work makes a difference.

Case study 3: CHUMS

Sector:

  • Mental health & wellbeing

Focus of project:

  • Programme design / theory of change facilitation
  • Developing impact plans
  • Performance management
  • Leadership development

CHUMS provides a wide range of trauma, emotional wellbeing and bereavement services to children, young people and families across Bedfordshire. The feedback they receive tells them that they provide a valuable and well regarded service. However, they were less sure about the wider social impact of their service. They sought to address this as commissioners are increasingly interested in the added value a service can generate.
Local Partnerships worked closely with CHUMS and specific pieces of work included:
• A review of CHUMS’ service lines
• The development of individual Theories of Change for the service lines
• Production of an overall Theory of Change for the organisation
• Stakeholder engagement
• Mapping the information collected as well as its use
• Initiating discussions on the systems needed to ensure CHUMS capture the right data to demonstrate their impact
Applying the knowledge gained from CHUMS’ business planning processes, they were able to refresh their strategic direction.
CHUMS felt that Local Partnerships was quick to demonstrate its understanding of CHUMS’ needs and identify a programme of work to address them.
Working collaboratively was welcomed by CHUMS as the approach enabled them to increase their managerial capacity and capability through, for example, coaching staff to understand how to approach the development of a Theory of Change.